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Art Exhibitions

 

Artifacts Series: Black/White/Flo Red Installation
Photo credit: PanicStudio LA

Terminal 1, Departures Level Concourse 
Artifacts Series: Black/White/Flo Red Installation  
By Jaime Scholnick  
(On view for ticketed passengers)

Using reclaimed Styrofoam packaging as her canvas, artist Jaime Scholnick has installed heaps of individually painted Styrofoam sculptures, transforming the ubiquitous material into art objects with fine markings and patterns of paint. The installation titled Artifacts Series: Black/White/Flo Red Installation, on display through July 2014, is a diverse collection of intricately painted shapes arranged and stacked like a repository of artifacts from ancient, modern and imaginary worlds. The shapes of the Styrofoam obliquely reference the shape of the consumer object it once held—a computer, a teapot, a space heater—while slyly reminding us of our never-ending desire for material goods. Scholnick’s mesmerizing patterns in black and white saturate every surface of the Styrofoam, with several of the sculptures spiked with a dose of fluorescent red paint. Color-changing LED lights add a burst of dynamic color to the complex composition. The Styrofoam forms can be interpreted in a multitude of ways, inviting viewers to contemplate the transient nature and the environmental impact of our consumer cravings.

 Terminal 1 Baggage Claim  LAXPOPPIES-sm
Photo credit: Kelly Barrie, Panic Studio LA

Terminal 1, Baggage Claim  
#LAXPOPPIES 
By Jorge Oswaldo 
(Open to the public)

Located in the terminal’s meet and greet area, #LAXPOPPIES is a playful twist on the tradition of greeting a loved one at the airport with flowers. Consisting of eight bold, expressive, and brilliantly colored canvases depicting poppies, this site-specific installation reinterprets the tradition of greeting a loved one at the airport with a bouquet of flowers for the age of social media, inviting travelers to pose in front of the poppy "backdrops" and share their photos through Instagram and Twitter using the exhibit’s hashtag title. Oswaldo conceived of #LAXPOPPIES as an experiment, in the hopes that individuals would document and share their personal moments at the airport, thereby contributing to an ongoing, collective chronicle of memories.

 Terminal 2 Departures Atrium Flow and Glimpse-sm
Photo credit: Kelly Barrie, Panic Studio LA

Terminal 2, Departures Atrium 
Flow and Glimpse  
By Barbara Strasen 
(Open to the public)

Flow and Glimpse depicts the rich textures and diversity of Los Angeles, providing a fresh view of the city and its relationship to contemporary life. Situated in the terminal’s atrium, on the publicly accessible side of the security checkpoint, this large-scale installation features 90 lenticular panels, so that the visible images change in response to the location of the viewer, providing an engaging and dynamic experience for travelers as they move through security. Each panel juxtaposes two images – one featuring a flow of textures and the other a detailed and diverse glimpse of L.A. –organized thematically on six walls of the atrium. The lenticular lenses are carefully choreographed, with the texture of the flow images uniting the different groups, while the fleeting glimpse images move along according to theme and context, in a way that suggests a dialogue among them, inviting the viewer to discover connections between seemingly dissimilar images.

Elevate 
Photo credit: Kelly Barrie, Panic Studio LA

Terminal 3, Departures Atrium 
Elevate 
By Joyce Dallal 
(Open to the public)  

Elevate transforms the terminal’s atrium in dramatic fashion, surrounding travelers as they approach security with two bird-like formations of paper airplanes suspended in flight. This visually stunning installation consists of hundreds of colorful and seemingly delicate paper airplanes, handmade from Japanese paper and imprinted with excerpts from the Third (1929) and Fourth (1949) Geneva Conventions, international treaties addressing the treatment of civilians and prisoners during war. Interspersed among these are white paper planes printed with the text of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), which details fundamental rights for all peoples. Echoing the power and fragility of these accumulations of words, the paper airplanes simultaneously recall military formations and flocks of birds spiraling upward. They reference the Japanese tradition of folding one thousand origami cranes for luck, long life, and peace.

Aquarium and Underwater Series 
Photo credit: PanicStudio LA

Terminal 3, Ticketing 
Aquarium and Underwater Series 
By Luciana Abait 
(Open to the public)  

Aquarium and Underwater Series is an exhibition composed of three artworks by Luciana Abait, each conjuring a surreal atmosphere out of the familiar environment of swimming pools. Aquarium is a large-scale, backlit photo-transparency installation featuring a grid of 24 illuminated photographs of swimmers and swimming pools captured from underwater. Imbued with translucent red tones, Abait’s vivid and detailed underwater images act like windows into the man-made environment of swimming pools that permeate the Southern California terrain. In Underwater Series, Abait displays two large, ruby-hued photographs depicting the floors and walls of swimming pools, offering abstract views that evoke vast, desolate landscapes. The crimson color of the water in these artworks, on view through December 2014, is a reference to its elemental counterparts, fire and lava, creating a glowing and mysterious setting for viewers to reflect on humanity’s relationship to the environment.

Encoding and Exponential 
Photo credit: Kelly Barrie, Panic Studio LA

Tom Bradley International Terminal, Arrivals/Customs  
Encoding and Exponential 
By Meeson Pae Yang  
(On view for ticketed passengers)

Meeson Pae Yang’s art installation, Encoding and Exponential, references the interconnected systems and intricacies of nature on a microscopic level. Yang focuses on the fascinating beauty of patterns and forms found in microscopic worlds and expands them into macroscopic environments that invite visual contemplation and exploration. Encased in the architectural environment of a display case, an ecosystem of floating, mirrored sculptures made from computer-engraved Plexiglas in the shape of diatoms gently sway, casting reflections of their intricate cellular patterns that intermingle throughout the space. Framing the installation at each end are configurations of LED-lit pouches forming colorfully interconnected systems referencing DNA-sequencing patterns. Together these sculptural forms speak of life in various elemental forms. Ultimately, the process, materials, and structures synthesize to create a collision of substances organic and mechanical, real and dream.

 Terminal 6 TicketingDepartures Why Are You Here No Thing To Declare Declare Everything
Photo credit: Kelly Barrie, Panic Studio LA

Terminal 6, Ticketing/Departures 
Why Are You Here / No Thing To Declare / Declare Experience 
By ETMCA (a.k.a. the Code Artist)
(Open to the public)

Why Are You Here / No Thing To Declare / Declare Experience consists of large, visually stunning paintings that, at first glance, appear to be abstract and thus devoid of literal meaning. However, imbedded within each painting is a code, merging abstract painting with concepts related to the experience of travel. Together the canvases pose the question "why are you here" and the statements "nothing to declare" and "declare experience." This site-specific installation is located at the heavily trafficked staircase and escalator leading to the security checkpoint, and the messages it contains speak to the site’s continuous flow of people coming and going, each of them carrying anticipation or memories of their journeys.  

 Welcome to L.A. / Please Come Again
Photo credit: PanicStudio LA

Terminal 7 and 8, Departures  
Welcome to L.A. / Please Come Again 
Curated by Milo + McLean
(On view for ticketed passengers)

Welcome to L.A./Please Come Again is a group exhibition of contemporary artworks by fifteen Los Angeles artists inspired by the multifaceted and evolving identity of Los Angeles as a vibrant metropolis. On view through December 2014, the exhibition features 37 diverse artworks that critically explore and delve into a range of Los Angeles’ celebrated, notorious, and enigmatic qualities through painting, photography, drawing, and mixed media. L.A.’s landscape is a stunning and complicated amalgam of cultures, people and possibility. From its iconic Pacific shores to the urban skylines dotting the city, L.A.’s “mythic glint” draws romantics and trailblazers alike. Welcome to L.A. / Please Come Again offers a range of dynamic artworks, providing a context for discussion, reflection, and interpretation for passengers who call this city home, as well as for first-time visitors to this wonderfully paradoxical paradise that is Los Angeles.

Featured artists include Jennifer Celio, Zoe Crosher, J. Bennett Fitts, Yvette Gellis, Jill Greenberg, Roni Feldman, Yolanda Gonzalez, Susan Holcomb, Christine Nguyen, Elizabeth Patterson, Richard Ross, Lana Shuttleworth, David Strick, Mark Stock, and Lacey Terrell.

 

About LAWA Art Program
Initiated in 1990, the purpose of the LAWA Art Program is to provide opportunities for educational, entertaining, and enriching cultural experiences for the traveling public at LAX and LA/Ontario International Airports and the LAX FlyAway® bus terminal. The program showcases local and regional artists through temporary exhibitions and permanent public art installations, which enhance and humanize the overall travel experience for millions every year. For additional information, please visit www.lawa.org.

About Los Angeles International Airport
LAX is the sixth busiest airport in the world and third in the United States, offering 680 daily flights to 96 domestic cities and 930 weekly nonstop flights to 59 cities in 30 countries on 63 commercial air carriers. It ranks 14th in the world and fifth in the U.S. in air cargo tonnage processed. In 2012, LAX served nearly 63.7 million passengers, processed over 1.9 million tons of air cargo valued at over $86.9 billion, and handled 605,480 aircraft operations (landings and takeoffs). An economic impact study in 2011 reported that operations at LAX generated 294,400 jobs in Los Angeles County with labor income of $13.6 billion and economic output of more than $39.7 billion. This activity added $2.5 billion to local and state revenues. LAX is part of a system of three Southern California airports – along with LA/Ontario International and Van Nuys general aviation – that are owned and operated by Los Angeles World Airports, a proprietary department of the City of Los Angeles that receives no funding from the City’s general fund.
 

For more information about LAX, please visit www.lawa.aero/lax or follow us on Twitter @LAX_Official, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LAInternationalAirport, and on YouTube at www.YouTube.com/laxairport1.